James Larkin and his Successes in Life

Irish parents bore James Larkin in Liverpool. However, he went to live in Newry, Ireland when he was just five years old. Later Larkin went back to England and was employed as a docker. He joined socialism and became a member of Independent Labor Party in 1893. When he was free, he would be selling the Clarion.

He continued working as a docker, and in 1893, he became a foreman for a company known as T & J Harrison Ltd. However, he lost the job just the following year after he went on strike complaining of poor pay and poor working conditions. Read more: James Larkin | Biography

His men who were also engaged in the strike were also sacked. Even after being sacked, he remained active in the union and was later elected as the general organizer of the organization known as the National Union of Dock Labourers.

According to Bertram Wolfe in his book, Jim Larkin was a man with a large frame and broad shoulders, and he stood over ordinary men while speaking to them. He describes him as having dark blue eyes and prominent cheekbone. Soon Larkin was sent by the union to Belfast. Learn more about Jim Larkin: http://ireland-calling.com/james-larkin/

When he went there, it was just three weeks when he recruited over four hundred other members. It was this time that the dock employers became worried of his moves and soon they sacked the members of his union. It is an action that led to a long dispute in the industry.

Jim Larkin also went to Dublin with the aim of organizing the casual who had no skills. He finally launched the union in Dublin. He wanted to unite the men, and it took only one year to attract over two thousand men. He was also at the same leading various strikes and Larkin was suspended by NUDL because of the concern of the costs of the industrial disputes.

After the suspension, Larkin decided to start his union, and it was the Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union. The union he started had branches in many places such as Dublin, Derry, Belfast, and Drogheda. It also had a political program that included issues such as the provision of workers for all those were not employed, working legal eight hours per day, and pension for all workers.

Part of organizing strikes, Larkin was also involved in temperance campaign. As some people would say, Larkin never engaged in smoking or drinking, and it was like a one-man crusade against drunkenness, and the poor dockworkers took this for granted. Larkin never talked a bad language, and no one has ever heard of a foul word from his mouth.

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